MAMMALS FOUND IN THE MOGGILL CREEK CATCHMENT

This listing was created by Ed Frazer, an MCCG member and prolific local wildlife photographer.

Supporting photos were taken within the Moggill Creek Catchment. They are the copyright of the person noted beneath each image. Many photographers are MCCG members.

We encourage MCCG members and non-members alike to submit photos taken locally of the listed species for inclusion. Please send your images to: edfrazer@piscesenterprises.com

The table has two categories:

1. Native mammals

2. Feral mammals - the Moggill Creek Catchment has some of the most serious feral animal problems in Brisbane, particularly cats, deer, foxes and dogs. 

                                 Sightings should be reported ASAP to the Brisbane City Council. Click here to open the online BCC Report-it form


 
1. NATIVE MAMMALS
       
   
Species name
(Common name in brackets)

Similar species found  Food  Notes 
 

© Ed Frazer 


© Chris Read

Antechinus, Brown  Other Antechinus spp.     Insects      
Worms 
Three similar species in the catchment.  Look similar to mice and occasionally enter houses.

Their teeth are quite sharp and they can be aggressive.

The one in the photo had entered a house adjacent to ridge-line bush.

They are more active after dark and are threatened by cats.

 

© Ed Frazer 
Antechinus, Buff-footed
(identification not confirmed)       
Other Antechinus spp.  Insects
Worms 
The recently described Buff-footed Antechinus has an even grey body colour, similar to the Brown Antechinus.

It has a light eye-ring which is absent on the Brown Antechinus.

The Buff-footed Antechinus differs from the Fawn-footed Antechinus which always has a pronounced rufous mid-body colour and a whitish eye ring.

This one was startled out of a crevice in a tree by a White-throated Treecreeper.

Threatened by cats and habitat destruction.

 

© Ed Frazer 


© Bryan Hacker

Antechinus, Fawn-footed Other Antechinus spp.  Insects
Worms 
This Antechinus came out in the early morning to take mealworms which were being fed to Painted Button-quail.

Found mainly in areas along creeks.

Threatened by cats. 

 

© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap



© Gordon Grigg 
Camera trap

Bandicoot, Long-nosed  Northern Brown Bandicoot         Insects
Grubs
Roots 
Digs holes in lawns and gardens searching for grubs and roots.

Difficult to distinguish from the Northern Bandicoot which has a similarly long nose. Has coarser fur and more rounded ears.

Threatened by cats, dogs and foxes.


 
© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap

Bandicoot, Northern  Long-nosed Bandicoot  Insects
Grubs
Roots 
Not as common in gardens. Prefers wetter gullies and areas alongside creeks.

Has pointed ears and finer fur than the Long-nosed Bandicoot. 

 

© Ed Frazer 


© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap

Brush-tailed Phascogale
(Tuan) 
None  Insects
Small birds
Small mammals      
Notorious for entering chicken pens and throttling birds which are bigger than itself.

Related to the Antechinus and to the Tasmanian Devil, the Tuan is strictly carnivorous.

Was once common in the catchment but is now seldom seen.

Threatened by cats, dogs and urbanisation. 

 

© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap

Dingo  Domestic dogs  Small mammals
Lizards 
Most dingoes in the catchment probably have some domestic dog inter-breeding but several have been photographed in the area using infra-red triggered cameras. They appear to have mainly Dingo features.
 
 

© Ruby Cooper-White


© Gordon Grigg
Camera trap


Echidna  None  Ants
Termites
Small grubs
Worms 
There are many echidnas in the catchment present along the creeks and right up to the tops of the valley ridges. They are rarely seen during daylight hours.

Threatened by habitat destruction and dogs.
 
 

© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap


© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap

Fawn-footed Melomys  Mice and small rats Probably vegetable matter  Found around the creeks where they search for insects in the leaf litter.

Quite common along Gold Creek.

Nocturnal and feed mainly on the ground but they also climb trees.

A little bigger than a mouse, the tail of the Melomys is almost hairless.

Threatened by cats and preyed upon by owls.

 

© Jim Pope 
(taken at Toowong)

Fruit Bat
(Grey-headed Flying Fox) 
Black and Small Red fruit bats    Figs
Mangos
Other fruit
Also feed on Eucalyptus blossom 
Probably come from colonies roosting along the Brisbane River.

Known to sometimes carry the fatal Hendra virus so avoid handling.


Weigh up to 1kg with a wingspan of 1m.


Numbers have reduced due to tree clearing.

  


© Prue Cooper-White  
Glider, Greater
 
Possums  Eucalpyts
New shoots
Leaves
 
Thought to be extinct in the catchment until Prue Cooper-White took this photo.

They are as large as a possum and feed entirely at night.

This one was photographed during the daytime because it had been disturbed out of its hole by the Lace Monitor.

Greater gliders occupy several large holes in trees. Due to the heavy removal of trees with hollows there is not much habitat left in the catchment for this glider species. 

White mahogany (Eucalyptus acmonoides) is one of the recognised trees in the catchment on which Greater gliders feed. They feed on the shoots.

Preyed upon by Powerful Owls.
  
 

© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap


© Chris Read

Glider, Squirrel  Sugar Glider  Sap from trees
Insects 
Quite common in the catchment and a real treat to watch in the evening if they "fly" from their hiding place high in a tree during the daytime.

A favourite prey of the Powerful Owl and the Boobook Owl.

Threatened by habitat destruction, especially old trees with suitable holes.
  
 

© Chris Read 

Glider, Sugar  Squirrel Glider  Sap from trees  Similar habitats to the Squirel Glider. Can be identified by white at the tip of its tail.

Less common in the catchment than the Squirrel Glider.

Threatened by owls and habitat destruction.
 
 


© Chris Read 
Glider, Feathertail  Squirrel Glider (but much smaller) Pollen
Seed
Nectar 
Much smaller than the Squirrel Glider.

Feathertail Gliders are the natural prey of Antechinus, Brush-tailed Pasocogale and owls.

Threatened by cats and habitat destruction.

*
For more info and a great story about Feathertail Gliders, read Chris Read's  Bush Bites article: A Suprisingly tricky Feathertail Glider Release
  
 

© Ed Frazer 
Koala  None  Main food trees in the catchment are: 
Grey Gum - Eucalyptus major
Tallowood - E. microcorys
Small-fruited Grey Gum - E. propinqua 
There are a few koalas in the catchment but they are seldom seen.

Domestic dogs and clearing have been the main cause of their heavily reduced numbers in the catchment.

Planting their favourite trees such as Grey Gums may help.

Koala scratches on Grey Gums are generally two parallel marks, much
deeper than those left by a possum.

 

© Chris Read 

Microbats  A number of species found in the
catchment 
Mainly insects, including moths and mosquitos  Roost in dark crevices either singly or in groups.

Main threat is habitat destruction.

 
 
© Ed Frazer 
Platypus  None  Aquatic worms
Dragonfly larvae
Yabbies etc sifted out from the mulm  at the bottom of the creek
Mainly active in the morning but can be seen throughout the day in pools that are heavily shaded.

Threatened by creeks being allowed to dry out completely by the illegal use of water by unregistered pumping during droughts.

Can be drowned in eel traps.

*
Since 2005 the MCCG has been running a platypus survey each September in partnership with the University of Queensland. This is completely volunteer-driven. To see more info, please click here.

 

© Alan Frazer 


© Jim Pope

Possum, Common Brushtail  Mountain Possum  New shoots from a wide variety of trees,
fruit and berries  
Sit in the hollows of trees during the day and feed through the night.

Often come to the ground to find fallen fruit and berries.

Enter houses regularly and are especially fond of apples and peanut butter!

Varies in colour widely but those in the catchment generally have some tan colouration.

Threatened by dogs and an ulcer-inducing disease known as Buruli Virus, a zoonotic virus which can affect people, also causing ulcers.
 
 

© Ed Frazer
Camera trap



© Ed Frazer 


© Gordon Grigg
Camera trap


Possum, Mountain  Common Brushtail Possum New shoots, fruit and berries
Suspected of taking eggs and hatchlings from trees 
Similar to the Brushtail Possum but the Mountain Possum has smaller, more rounded ears and is always grey or black on the back, and white underneath.

Threatened by dogs. 
 

© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap

Possum, Ringtail  Mountain Possum
Common Brushtail Possum
 
New shoots and flowers  Easily separated from the two Brushtail Possums by its very short-haired tail which it can use for gripping branches.

Threatened by dogs.

 

© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap

Red-necked Pademelon  Young wallabies  Grasses on the edge of Lantana or thick scrub  Very shy animal that uses the protection of the Lantana or scrub from which it rarely ventures.

It is usually single and when disturbed makes a single loud "thump" with its tail and disappears into the thickest part of available bushes.

Almost impossible to see during daylight hours and photographed only by using infra-red triggered cameras.

Threatened by dogs and urbanisation.

*
To learn more, take a look at Ed Frazer's Bush Bites article: Red-necked Pademelons are here
 
 

© Ed Frazer 


© Ed Frazer 


Mother & joey
© Ed Frazer 

Wallaby, Red-necked  Swamp wallaby  Grasses
Some broad-leaved weeds 
The most common wallaby in the catchment.

Often seen in the day in small family groups of females or single males. Swamp
 wallabies feed both in the early morning and evenings, continuing through the night.

Threatened by dogs and habitat destruction.


*
 For more info about wallabies in our catchment (and some great photos), read Ed Frazer's Bush Bites article: Which Wallaby?
 
 

© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap


© Gordon Grigg

Wallaby, Swamp  Red-necked wallaby  Herbs
Fungi
Grasses 
Usually found singly, and often a female carrying a joey.

Generally found in deep scrub, venturing out at night.

Feed at night almost entirely.

Threatened mostly by habitat destruction and dogs.
 

 
© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap

Water Rat  None  Snails
Fish
Insects
Yabbies
Frogs
Even get into chook sheds! 
Quite a large rodent which can grow to the size of a cat. Has a very obvious white tip to its tail.

A savage carnivore which lives in holes in creek banks.

Common in the catchment but seldom seen as it goes about its destruction at night.

Threatened by habitat destruction and possibly cats. 
 

2. FERAL MAMMALS
 
   
Name
Similar species found  Food  Notes 
 

© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap


© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap

Cat  None  Birds 
Mammals
Lizards
Cats are by far the most serious feral pest in the catchment. Between 2013 and 2017 Brisbane City Council caught nearly 4000 feral animals. 80% of these were cats.

There are large numbers of feral cats which should be trapped and destroyed but, additionally, many well fed, obviously domesticated cats are also photographed hunting at night via infra-red cameras. They kill lizards, frogs, birds and many small marsupials.

Domesticated cats should never be allowed to roam at night.
 

 
© Ed Frazer 


© Ed Frazer 


© Ed Frazer 

Deer, Fallow  Red deer
Rusa deer 
Tree shoots
Herbs and grasses 
Fallow deer are the most common deer in the catchment. They can be recognised by white spots on their body, a white rear end and the palmate form of their antlers.

They damage many young trees and the bark of larger shrubs.
 
Brisbane City Council is actively reducing their numbers as they are creating a traffic hazard.
 
 

© Ed Frazer 


© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap


Deer, Rusa  Fallow deer
Red deer 
Tree shoots
Herbs and grasses 
Larger than the Fallow Deer and usually grey or brown. Males have separate spikes on their antlers.

Some completely white Rusa deer have been seen in the catchment.

It has been suggested that these deer are carriers of a Lymes-like disease which is spread by ticks.
 
 

© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap

Dog  Dingo  Animals
Birds
Carrion 
Several domestic dogs have been photographed at night by the infra-red cameras.

Some are heavily infected with mange whilst others look like domestic pets.

Whilst not as destructive as cats, feral dogs do take some wildlife and pose a risk of transferring disease and parasites to domestic pets.
 
 

© Ed Frazer 
Camera trap


© Ed Frazer 

Fox  Dingo
Domestic dog
Birds
Small mammals 
Foxes are second to cats in the damage they cause in the catchment. They regularly kill large numbers of fowl, but only take one to eat.

The fox illustrated was photographed via infra-red camera as it took a bandicoot. 

The fox in the trap came back for a second feed on one of the birds it had killed previously.

Foxes are particularly ruthless predators of the rare ground breeding birds we have in the catchment.
 
 

© Ed Frazer 


© Ed Frazer 

Hare  None  Grass
Some herbs
Garden vegetables 
There are huge numbers of hare in the catchment. On nearly every grassed area you will see their round, marble-sized droppings.

They feed in the early mornings and late into the night.
 


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